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GMAT @ Aspirit

Duration: Six-Seven weeks

Course Start Dates: You can start our GMAT Exam Preparation course on any Monday

Course Description:

  • Daytime: 10-13 hours per week and homework review
  • Regular practice tests and tasks that allow students to become familiar with the exam structure and a variety of content
  • Feedback and academic counselling that allows students to target specific areas of weakness and ways to improve on them

Facilities & Structure

  • Pioneer & Most Demanded Front- line Teachers
  • Innovative & Updated Materials
  • Doubt-Discussion Hours, Confusion Clearance Corner and Weekly Common Test & Model Exams
  • Our classrooms are well equipped with AC, projector and multimedia presentation.
  • Free Materials for practice, well equipped library with books, references materials, computers and free Wi-Fi.
  • Centrally Located, Accessible from All Parts of Capital.
Why GMAT?

The GMAT is a 3½-hour standardized exam designed to predict how test takers will perform academically in MBA (Masters in Business Administration) programs. GMAT scores are used by graduate business schools to make admission decisions. You might sometimes see the GMAT referred to as the GMAT CAT. The acronym CAT stands for Computer Adaptive Test. Actually, only two of the exam's four sections (Quantitative and Verbal) are computer-adaptive, meaning that during those sections only the test adapts to your ability level as you go.

The GMAT is developed by GMAC (Graduate Management Admission Council), which determines what kinds of skills the GMAT should measure — and how it should measure them. Another organization actually develops the test questions, administers the test, and reports test scores to the schools — all at the behest of GMAC.

To gain admission to an MBA program, chances are you'll need to take the GMAT. About two-thirds of the 1,900+ graduate business schools around the world require GMAT scores for admission, although an increasing number of schools accept GRE General Test scores as an alternative to GMAT scores. Schools that do not require GMAT scores nevertheless welcome GMAT scores to help access an applicant's qualifications.

Test Format

The GMAT seeks to measure four broad skill areas: analytical writing, quantitative reasoning, verbal reasoning, and integrated reasoning (which embraces analytical, quantitative, and verbal reasoning). The exam gauges these skills through four components, presented in the order listed here:

  • a 30-minute Analytical Writing Assessment (one writing task)
  • a 30-minute Integrated Reasoning section (12 multiple-choice questions, most of which are multi-part)
  • a 75-minute Quantitative section (37 multiple-choice questions)
  • a 75-minute Verbal section (41 multiple-choice questions)

For each of the four exam sections, a separate scaled score and percentile rank are awarded. A combined Quantitative/Verbal score (called a Total score) and corresponding percentile rank are also awarded. The GMAT is not a pass/fail test.

For more info, please visit:
www.mba.com/global